Carr’s Hill Rehabilitation

Designed by architect Stanford White and constructed in 1909, Carr’s Hill is home to the President of the University of Virginia and provides meeting and entertainment space for University events. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register, this signature historic property has been renovated for the first time. Glavé & Holmes, in collaboration with Associated Architects John G Waite Associates,  prepared a feasibility study to provide programming and a site study for a new entertainment pavilion. The study included site analysis, massing studies and the development of a site plan. The team was subsequently awarded the full project to restore the exterior and interior of the historic house, as well as provide outdoor event space.

The renovation work was designed and executed to high preservation standards and in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. The landscape was also sensitively redesigned to support events in an unobtrusive way. The goal was to minimize permanent change to significant features of the buildings and site while making it more functional for modern use. Restoration design was also completed for the out-buildings located on the Carr’s Hill site.

Carr’s Hill was awarded first place for Historic Preservation at the IIDA Virginia & West Virginia Chapter/ASID IDEAS Awards, AIA Virginia’s Excellence in Design Historic Preservation Honor Award as well as the Historic Preservation Merit Award from AIA Richmond. This project is LEED Certified.

Sandy Hall Renovation

SANDY HALL, CONSTRUCTED IN 1924, is located adjacent to Virginia Tech’s Drillfield at the core of the University, and is one of the earliest buildings on campus. The 10,960-square-foot building previously served as temporary swing space for academic programs in transition, without any major renovation since its initial construction. Glavé & Holmes designed a matched pair of contextual additions for updated circulation as well as a total interior renovation of the original building. The renovated building provides critical program space for the School of Neuroscience, created in 2016, which now calls the building home. The School of Neuroscience, the first school of its kind in the United States, sought an interior environment that would stimulate casual but innovative interactions among students and faculty, facilitating spontaneous discovery of new ideas.

Robinson House Rehabilitation

THE VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS engaged Glavé & Holmes for the complete rehabilitation of the Robinson House, originally erected ca. 1820 as a family farmhouse. The structure was converted into the R.E. Lee Camp No. 1 before it became part of the VMFA in 1964. The museum’s goal was to restore the facility and adapt it for use as a regional visitor center. The Robinson House was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013 and is one of the oldest buildings in the Boulevard Historic District of Richmond. The reimagined building houses the Richmond Region Tourism Center, VMFA’s Human Resources Division, and a first-floor gallery featuring an exhibition about the story of the site from the 17th century to the present.

The project has added 3,200 additional square feet to the original 7,600- square-foot structure. The addition complements the former home’s style and introduces an accessible entrance. The expansion houses an elevator, stairway, and three floors of glass-enclosed porches that connect to the original structure. Interior work included restoring the space to reflect historical accuracies. New mechanical and electrical systems are among other building updates.

Reids’s Row Renovation

REID’S ROW is one of the earliest examples of Italianate architecture in Richmond, Virginia. The three bow front townhouses are located at 219-223 Governor Street near Richmond’s Capitol Square. The property, constructed in 1853 and designed by James Morson as a rental property, is now largely vacant. Reid’s Row is the only remaining evidence of the residential neighborhood that once surrounded Capitol Square and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The buildings have received various upgrades and general refurbishment; however, they have deteriorated significantly since vacancy.

The Department of General Services hired G&HA for the renovation and adaptive reuse of Reid’s Row. G&HA began the process with a historic assessment, which will help guide the careful repairs and upgrades to the historic property. The three buildings have a total floor area of approximately 24,000 square feet, which is split over four stories. One challenge has been determining how to provide accessible circulation between each building. The design team is working to strategically insert a new circulation spine and tower that will provide an accessible route to each floor. The renovated facility will provide offices and various spaces for use by the state government.

Westhampton on Grove

WESTHAMPTON ON GROVE is a mixed-use redevelopment of the old Westhampton Theater and Long & Foster properties at 5706 & 5702 Grove Avenue. Glavé & Holmes provided a design for two, three-story mixed-used buildings in this Near West End neighborhood of Richmond.

Westhampton on Grove is the result of community outreach, careful planning, thoughtful design, and cooperation with neighborhood businesses and residents to breathe new life into a legacy property.  Glavé & Holmes worked with the developers to create a high quality mixed-use project that serves the residents and businesses in Westhampton, while complimenting and strengthening the scale and character of the community surrounding it.

Retail and restaurant spaces occupy the first floor with offices on the second floor. The third floor features luxury condos with one to two bedroom floorplans. The pedestrian-oriented design is consistent with the scale and character of the existing fabric of the Libbie and Grove corridor.

Westhampton School Redevelopment

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE is working with Thalhimer Realty Partners (TRP) and Bon Secours on the mixed-use redevelopment of the historic Westhampton School. The 1917 school building will be renovated and converted into commercial office space with an outdoor plaza near the northwest corner of Patterson and Libbie avenues.

The project will include 129 apartment units, some of which will sit above retail and office space fronting Patterson. Another section of apartments will wrap around a three-level parking deck. The development will consist of more than 250,000 square feet in total.

Davidson Hall Renovation

VIRGINIA TECH selected Glavé & Holmes for the renovation of three historic academic facilities on their campus, including Davidson Hall. This project rehabilitated the historic front section of Davidson Hall to provide a new administrative center for the Department as well as active learning classrooms.

The front section of Davidson Hall, covering 28,133 square feet, houses seven classrooms, in addition to multiple administrative and faculty offices for the Department of Chemistry. The building, which dates to the 1930s, received a full overhaul into a modern teaching-and-research building.

Visitors to Davidson Hall are welcomed by a new two-story atrium at the front entrance. The open atrium incorporates elements of both the traditional Collegiate Gothic and modern architecture styles seen throughout campus. Interior enhancements to the front section of the building include renovated classrooms, administrative and faculty offices, expanded A/V capabilities, modern furnishings, and a new collaborative scale-up classroom. The team fully renovated the building’s exterior and interior to remedy extensive egress and ADA deficiencies, deteriorated building systems, and flood plain vulnerability.

College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building Renovation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES was hired by Virginia Tech for the renovation of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building, originally constructed in 1899 as a YMCA building. The 14,314-square-foot building was one of the most outdated buildings on campus and received a comprehensive interior and exterior renovation. Interior upgrades include an elevator, new  energy-efficient systems, modern furnishings, and enhanced technology. A 2,000-square-foot, four-story addition was added to the northwest side.

The renovation retained several historical features. A point of pride for the building’s original architecture was the discovery, during demolition, of a large archway. Through the years and the re-purposing of the building, previous efforts had enclosed the archway. Once rediscovered, the team restored and reinstalled the archway casework.

The building is now the administrative home to the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, housing both the Office of the Dean and the Center for Humanities.

Shenkman Jewish Center

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE collaborated with the College of William and Mary to create a dedicated home for the college’s Jewish community. The team worked on the design and construction of the new Shenkman Jewish Center, a 3,000-square-foot Hillel House, as programmed and conceptualized in a planning study. This community building is situated on two lots at the corner of Jamestown Road and Cary Street. The building had the unique requirement of not only adhering to the architectural character of the campus, but also fitting in to the residential context of the surrounding homes. The building’s first floor features a large and open meeting space, an intimate study lounge, a kosher kitchen, and restrooms. The second floor provides space for a Rabbi’s office, a conference room, and a restrooms. A wooden pergola on the patio in the rear of the building is planned for future construction to accommodate a religious festival and other events.

Fine Arts Center

CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY (CNU) hired Glavé & Holmes to design a new Fine Arts Center adjacent to their Ferguson Center for the Arts. The three-story, 82,000 plus-square-foot center will house gallery and programming space for CNU’s fine arts program. The space will also be the new home for Newport News’ Peninsula Fine Arts Center, which will become part of CNU at the building’s completion and will take on a new name. The colonnade, which lines the front of the Ferguson Center, will be extended across the front side of the new building.

The highlight of the building features three tall, staggered glass domes, while the rest of the design fits contextually with the rest of the campus. The first floor houses an art history lecture hall, museum shop, a hands-on gallery, and studios for 3-D art disciplines. Part of the space between the new building and the Ferguson Center will be an outdoor museum space. The museum’s large gallery, the walls of which are two stories high, takes up most of the second and third floors. Moveable walls and structures will allow the space to be configured to display each exhibit. The second floor will also contain galleries for student work, classroom and lab spaces, including a dark room, photo lab, light lab, and digital art studios. The third floor will include drawing and painting studios, as well as studios only for upperclassmen. A cafe will provide food near the outdoor terraces overlooking the entryway.