Robinson House Rehabilitation

THE VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS engaged Glavé & Holmes for the complete rehabilitation of the Robinson House, originally erected ca. 1820 as a family farmhouse. The structure was converted into the R.E. Lee Camp No. 1 before it became part of the VMFA in 1964. The museum’s goal was to restore the facility and adapt it for use as a regional visitor center. The Robinson House was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013 and is one of the oldest buildings in the Boulevard Historic District of Richmond. The reimagined building houses the Richmond Region Tourism Center, VMFA’s Human Resources Division, and a first-floor gallery featuring an exhibition about the story of the site from the 17th century to the present.

The project has added 3,200 additional square feet to the original 7,600- square-foot structure. The addition complements the former home’s style and introduces an accessible entrance. The expansion houses an elevator, stairway, and three floors of glass-enclosed porches that connect to the original structure. Interior work included restoring the space to reflect historical accuracies. New mechanical and electrical systems are among other building updates.

Reids’s Row Renovation

REID’S ROW is one of the earliest examples of Italianate architecture in Richmond, Virginia. The three bow front townhouses are located at 219-223 Governor Street near Richmond’s Capitol Square. The property, constructed in 1853 and designed by James Morson as a rental property, is now largely vacant. Reid’s Row is the only remaining evidence of the residential neighborhood that once surrounded Capitol Square and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The buildings have received various upgrades and general refurbishment; however, they have deteriorated significantly since vacancy.

The Department of General Services hired G&HA for the renovation and adaptive reuse of Reid’s Row. G&HA began the process with a historic assessment, which will help guide the careful repairs and upgrades to the historic property. The three buildings have a total floor area of approximately 24,000 square feet, which is split over four stories. One challenge has been determining how to provide accessible circulation between each building. The design team is working to strategically insert a new circulation spine and tower that will provide an accessible route to each floor. The renovated facility will provide offices and various spaces for use by the state government.

Scott House Study and Rehabilitation

THE SCOTT HOUSE  is one of Richmond’s most significant examples of American Renaissance architecture and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was completed in 1911 and acquired by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in 2001. The 18,000-square-foot mansion was built for Frederic William Scott and his wife Elizabeth Strother Scott. It was modeled after the Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island, which referenced the Petit Trianon at Versailles. Interior plasterwork is attributed to prominent sculptor and plaster contractor, Ferruccio Legnaioli.

VCU commissioned Glavé & Holmes Architecture (G&HA) to provide a feasibility study to assess existing conditions, programming, and conceptual design. Subsequently, G&HA was selected to provide a historically-sensitive rehabilitation to allow the building to serve as meeting and event space for visiting and University groups.

Goals for rehabilitation the Scott House included restoration of the exterior masonry and windows; upgraded mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems; and new restrooms, office space and meeting rooms. While the rehabilitation will serve a variety of modern programmatic functions, the building’s historic fabric was restored in accordance with the Secretaty of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and the University’s preservation philosophy for historic buildings.

Madison Hall Renovation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE renovated the nearly 70,000 sf building that previously housed the Rockingham Memorial Hospital Cancer Center, for use as a new Admissions Office for James Madison University. The building was constructed in 1989 as a clinical annex to the hospital. The project consisted of a full interior renovation as well as restorative work to the exterior envelope. Additionally, a new colonnade with a tower and a pavilion was provided to create a welcoming entry to the building.

The renovated facility houses the Admissions Office, the Center for Assessment and Research Studies, the Graduate School and the Office of International Programs. The conversion of the previous nuclear medicine area provided a nuclear laboratory for the Physics department. The new design provides faculty and staff offices, meeting rooms, small scale academic spaces, and other mixed uses serving the needs of the University.

Fort Monroe Visitor and Education Center

FORT MONROE is a National Monument managed by the Fort Monroe Authority (FMA) in collaboration with the National Park Service (NPS). Glavé & Holmes Architecture completed the conversion of Building 138 at Fort Monroe into a new Visitor Center. Building 138, also known as Wisser Hall, was originally built in 1909 as a military library and is a contributing structure to the Fort Monroe National Historic Landmark District.

This project is a unique example of a State and Federal collaboration at this significant historic site. The Visitor Center welcomes visitors to Fort Monroe and orients them to the significant history of this property in addition to providing a welcome center for NPS staff to greet visitors to the National Monument. As a key component of the new permanent exhibit, this building tells the story of the arrival of the first African slaves in the continental U.S. to the site of Fort Monroe (Point Comfort) in 1619 and connects that story to the “Contraband of War” decision in 1861 that eventually led approximately 10,000 enslaved people to obtain their emancipation at Fort Monroe. The visitor center builds upon the additional historical exhibits in the Casemate Museum and entices visitors to the museum using the postern gate into the original masonry Fort. The new Visitor Center contains visitor facilities, a staffed visitor desk, exhibits, classrooms and archival storage space.  A new addition makes the building fully accessible, by adding a new elevator and grade level entry for visitors.

The Spa at Colonial Williamsburg

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE (G&HA) was commissioned to adapt and reuse the former Rockefeller Folk Art Museum into a new spa and fitness center to serve the Williamsburg Inn and the Williamsburg Lodge. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s goal to provide and enhance amenities in this vintage two-building complex serves the needs of tourists and business travelers. Extensive interior renovations were required to convert these structures into a 4-star luxury spa. Working in conjunction with WTS International Spa Consultants, the new spa includes 12 treatment rooms, expansive wet room amenities in all locker rooms, a salon, and fitness areas for equipment and group fitness. An existing sunken garden, pool, and other surrounding elements were incorporated into this renovation.

Robert H. Smith Center at Montalto

ORIGINALLY DESIGNED in 1903 by Philadelphia architect Charles Barton Keene, Montalto was adapted and expanded by Glavé & Holmes Architecture (G&HA) to provide multiple new functions including a meeting space, teleconferencing center, accommodations for visiting dignitaries, and an event space. The new facility has become the “upper campus” for the Monticello property; it houses the executive Board Room for the Thomas Jefferson Foundation and creates a world-class extension of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies.

To achieve the ambitious program, Montalto underwent a complete restoration of the interior and exterior and now features the design of two sympathetic additions. The front façade, restored to its historic appearance, showcases the distinctive Ludowici tile roof in its original color, restoration of the original stone masonry, and rehabilitation of
the original historic windows. An entirely new landscape design
has been incorporated to provide parking, outdoor terraces, and event space that blends into the natural splendor of the hilltop site overlooking Charlottesville. A state-of-the-art catering kitchen avails the center to be used for events, lectures, and weddings. New infrastructure and technology systems and the interior design and selection of all furniture, fixtures, and equipment complete the scope.

The project achieved LEED-Silver certification.

Brody Jewish Center

The Brody Jewish Center is a Hillel House located in the Rugby Road-University Corner historical district near the University of Virginia grounds.  It was founded in 1941 and provides social programs, community service opportunities, educational seminars, and religious offerings for the University’s Jewish students. The historic building, named the Larry W. Berman Student Center, was originally a residence built in 1913-14 with an addition later built in 2011. Glavé & Holmes Architecture and Martin Horn were engaged to renovate a portion of the existing facility and provide improvements to the surrounding site.

The house was renovated to accommodate the current staff in a more functional office setting, attract students for studying and socializing, and increase student and staff interaction. The design is in compliance with the Secretary of Interior’s Standards and is expected to receive state historic tax credits.

Office of Admissions Renovation

G&H renovated and altered the former Old Bookstore at the College of William & Mary to serve as the new location for the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. This office serves as the “front door” to the university, introducing prospective students and their parents to the College. The design includes a 300-seat sessions room to facilitate the orientation process, conference rooms, offices, and administrative support spaces. The design respects the architectural and cultural context of the College, while also effectively communicating that the College is progressively prepared to meet the challenges and expectations of education in the twenty-first century.

Mississippi Museum of Art

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE (G&HA) served as the museum consultant and design architect for the Mississippi Museum of Art (MMA). The museum wished to become a demonstrable leader in the international trend of museums becoming more accessible, participatory, and relevant in their communities. The new building, in accord with the MMA’s commitment to community interaction and personal experience, serves as a model for mid-sized museums whose architecture embodies their mission to engage the community in and through the visual arts.

The result includes new exhibit areas, gift shop, a café, studio school, collections area, and administrative spaces. From jazz programs in the café to performances and presentations in the galleries and the sculpture garden, the MMA attracts people to downtown Jackson and plays a vital role in its revitalization.

The Mississippi Museum of Art was designed in association with Madge Bemiss Architect of Richmond, Virginia, and Dale and Associates of Jackson, Mississippi.