Virginia General Assembly Building

Glavé & Holmes Architecture, Associate Architect, and Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Lead Architect, served as the design team for Virginia’s new General Assembly Building, a new 415,000 sf facility located on Richmond’s historic Capitol Square. As the first purpose-built facility for the General Assembly since Thomas Jefferson’s Capitol, the building houses individual offices for the 140 legislators, offices for legislative staff, public meeting rooms, a cafeteria, and other administrative spaces to support the General Assembly. Replacing an existing collection of buildings assembled over time, the new facility retains the southern and eastern facades of the historic Life Insurance Company of Virginia headquarters, repurposing the handsome classical composition and using its form to regulate the design of the new and contextually sensitive components, resulting in a proper home for the General Assembly on Capitol Square.

Glavé & Holmes (G&H) was responsible for the architectural interiors and interior design of floors four through fourteen, which accommodate the offices for the legislators, staff, and leadership of the General Assembly. A critical part of this project involved coordination of move management to ensure that proper swing space was available for the General Assembly during construction of the new building. While planning was underway for the new building, G&H designed the renovation of the nearby Pocahontas Building to serve as the temporary swing space. The G&H team then managed the logistics of displacing and relocating building tenants twice during the project – first into the Pocahontas Building and then to the new building, once complete. G&H coordinated fixtures, furnishings, and equipment installation for the Pocahontas building, as well as for the new General Assembly Building.

Poolhouse

THE POOLHOUSE REFLECTS the refined Georgian Revival of the main house by William Lawrence Bottomley. The poolhouse takes the form of a three bay loggia flanked by pedimented pavilions. It is distinguish by brick corbels, inset stucco panels, rubbed brick arches and a low parapet.

The poolouse design includes rich blue color, timeless brass lighting and hardware, and bluestone flooring that runs out to the pool. The three french doors with arched transoms and matching casement windows on the opposite side emulate a loggia. This space creates a refined upstairs opening out to the pool with a more informal downstairs, perfect for kids. The space boasts a full kitchen with built in table, seating area, bathroom with shower, changing room, and laundry which extends out to a custom mudroom with ample storage that elevates this whole residence.

Kingsmill Residence

Glavé & Holmes was brought on to demolish the owner’s current house and build a new home on the current home site with water views on three sides. Consistent with their goals, the focus of the project was to craft a gracious flow between the primary rooms of the house while maximizing views out to the water. The design centers around an arrival court with the main house centered and anchoring this paved elegant arrival. Wings on each side contain the more private aspects of the house, each of which were designed to embrace and showcase the family’s collection of art and furnishings collected over many years of travel. The rear of the house flows out to covered porches and a large bluestone, elevated patio which engages with the landscape beyond. Throughout the house, on both levels, rooms have windows and balconies to introduce light and take advantage of the site’s unique water views. This project was done in collaboration with Smith McClane Architects.

Virginia Museum of History & Culture Capital Improvements

OVER THE LAST thirty years, Glavé & Holmes Architecture has engaged in a partnership with the Virginia Museum of History Culture (VMHC) to expand, envision and elevate nearly the entire 200,000 sf facility which houses nearly nine million objects of Virginia history. Since 1990, G&H has completed four major expansion projects (1991, 2001, 2006, 2013, and 2022). Over this time, work has included renovation of the original historic building, known as the Battle Abbey (1913), as well as five subsequent expansions. G&H’s work has provided new galleries, a research library, a theater, public meeting spaces, and the design for extensive collections storage areas within the facility. Our most recent work includes renovation of the library, the expansion of the main public hall, a new gift shop, café and meeting rooms, updated staff office space and extensive gallery upgrades. The exterior grounds have also been extensively updated over the last two campaigns.

The renovations and expansions have corresponded with the museum’s evolution from what was once more of a research institution with limited public visitation to a site that now has become the public center to tell the complex stories of Virginia history. G&H has worked with multiple generations of the organizational administrations to plan and respond to changing museum needs and trends that have driven their evolution as a public museum. The renovations in 2022 were the most comprehensive to the public areas, aimed at re-establishing cohesion across the museum, expanding multi-purpose spaces, brightening the lobby and providing a more compelling overall visitor experience.

Pannill-Smith Hall

Glavé & Holmes designed a new academic building for Virginia Episcopal School (VES), a private boarding/day school located in Lynchburg, Virginia. Pannill-Smith Hall provides an innovative, yet grounded, learning environment that encourages open collaboration and provides educators the flexibility to design curricula that demonstrate the core philosophies of VES.

The design exhibits a timeless, sustainable, and forward-looking design to revitalize the core philosophies of the school and feature inspiring spaces that promote intellectual playfulness between and amongst the faculty and students. The building is adaptable to changing needs and program and provides flexibility to serve a variety of approaches to learning and teaching.

2325 Monument Avenue Rehabilitation

2325 MONUMENT AVENUE was designed by noted Richmond architect Duncan Lee in 1914 for J. P. Taylor. The 12,244 sf stucco-clad Mediterranean villa has a three-story central block with two-story wings and is capped with a tile roof. G&H provided professional historic rehabilitation and design services concerning the overall preservation of the house, as well as alterations to the first and second floors of the west service wing. A comprehensive Condition Assessment was conducted at the start of the project.

Waterford Mill Rehabilitation

THIS HISTORIC MERCHANT MILL in the National Historic Landmark village of Waterford was built in about 1830. It has been used since the 1940s as the site of a popular annual craft fair and as a symbol of the village’s history and integrity. Constant inundation of the foundation by water from Catoctin Creek, has taken a toll on the building over many years. The first phase of the project consisted of a full historic structure report, analyzing the building’s form and condition in the light of its historic significance, and outlining a series of recommendations for returning it to the best condition for long-term preservation. The second phase, recently completed, made the structural and architectural adaptations needed to bring the recommendations to completion as a fully interpreted, safe, and engaging part of Waterford’s heritage. Actions included lowering the wheel pit to a level that would permit water to readily exit to the creek, reconstructing the massive timber hurst frame that supports the milling equipment, bringing the building up to code, and making nearly invisible improvements to the structural system.

Science and Engineering Research Center

The new Science and Engineering Research Center at Christopher Newport University is being added to the existing Luter Hall. The project will expand and enhance opportunities for students in high-demand STEM disciplines and will provide technology-rich instructional space for the departments of Physics, Computer Science, Engineering,  Mathematics, Kinesiology, Neuroscience, and Environmental Management. The building will accommodate state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories, classrooms, and maker spaces, as well as opportunities for cross disciplinary and faculty-student interaction and collaboration.

The architecture supports the University’s Neo-Georgian aesthetic and continues the cohesive character for the buildings surrounding the Great Lawn.

Allen Hall

Glavé & Holmes Architecture designed a new STEM academic building on Longwood University’s campus. The project established a gateway and east campus entry point. The multistory building complements the historic campus core and High Street buildings in the Palladian-Jeffersonian campus architectural style.

This structure serves as a multipurpose, adaptive building that provides approximately 43,000 square feet of academic space for student undergraduate programs. The building contains laboratories, faculty offices, various-sized classrooms, collaborative learning space, student research/inquiry space, the Center for Academic Faculty Enrichment, digital and distance learning facilities, other academic support spaces as well as a permanent home for Longwood’s Herbarium collection.

A prime function of the new building is the provision of Behavioral Studies Laboratories with accompanying vivarium, lab procedure spaces, and ancillary lab support. Two “dry lab” programs are served by the Exercise Physiology Laboratory, and a Kinesiology motion-capture studio. The project is targeted to achieve LEED Silver designation.

Liberty University School of Business

Liberty University desired a world-class, nationally recognized facility with a global reach for its new School of Business. The 78,000 sf building is located in the historic core precinct of campus and its exterior reflects and enhances the contextual, traditional character of its surrounding precinct. The building’s interior employs a contemporary aesthetic to express the School’s mission and vision for the program.

The School of Business emphasizes the connection between business and technology, showcases the integration of IT and business, and addresses the global economy. The new facility embraces technology to connect to the national business community. It advances trends for learning by including simulated work environments; spaces for collaborative, team-based learning and presentations; forward-thinking technology; spaces for interdisciplinary connectivity and entrepreneurship; a cyber security lab; and a data center.