Virginia Museum of History & Culture Capital Improvements

OVER THE LAST thirty years, Glavé & Holmes Architecture has engaged in a partnership with the Virginia Museum of History Culture (VMHC) to expand, envision and elevate nearly the entire 200,000 sf facility which houses nearly nine million objects of Virginia history. Since 1990, G&H has completed four major expansion projects (1991, 2001, 2006, 2013, and 2022). Over this time, work has included renovation of the original historic building, known as the Battle Abbey (1913), as well as five subsequent expansions. G&H’s work has provided new galleries, a research library, a theater, public meeting spaces, and the design for extensive collections storage areas within the facility. Our most recent work includes renovation of the library, the expansion of the main public hall, a new gift shop, café and meeting rooms, updated staff office space and extensive gallery upgrades. The exterior grounds have also been extensively updated over the last two campaigns.

The renovations and expansions have corresponded with the museum’s evolution from what was once more of a research institution with limited public visitation to a site that now has become the public center to tell the complex stories of Virginia history. G&H has worked with multiple generations of the organizational administrations to plan and respond to changing museum needs and trends that have driven their evolution as a public museum. The renovations in 2022 were the most comprehensive to the public areas, aimed at re-establishing cohesion across the museum, expanding multi-purpose spaces, brightening the lobby and providing a more compelling overall visitor experience.

Pannill-Smith Hall

Glavé & Holmes designed a new academic building for Virginia Episcopal School (VES), a private boarding/day school located in Lynchburg, Virginia. Pannill-Smith Hall provides an innovative, yet grounded, learning environment that encourages open collaboration and provides educators the flexibility to design curricula that demonstrate the core philosophies of VES.

The design exhibits a timeless, sustainable, and forward-looking design to revitalize the core philosophies of the school and feature inspiring spaces that promote intellectual playfulness between and amongst the faculty and students. The building is adaptable to changing needs and program and provides flexibility to serve a variety of approaches to learning and teaching.

2325 Monument Avenue Rehabilitation

2325 MONUMENT AVENUE was designed by noted Richmond architect Duncan Lee in 1914 for J. P. Taylor. The 12,244 sf stucco-clad Mediterranean villa has a three-story central block with two-story wings and is capped with a tile roof. G&H provided professional historic rehabilitation and design services concerning the overall preservation of the house, as well as alterations to the first and second floors of the west service wing. A comprehensive Condition Assessment was conducted at the start of the project.

Waterford Mill Rehabilitation

THIS HISTORIC MERCHANT MILL in the National Historic Landmark village of Waterford was built in about 1830. It has been used since the 1940s as the site of a popular annual craft fair and as a symbol of the village’s history and integrity. Constant inundation of the foundation by water from Catoctin Creek, has taken a toll on the building over many years. The first phase of the project consisted of a full historic structure report, analyzing the building’s form and condition in the light of its historic significance, and outlining a series of recommendations for returning it to the best condition for long-term preservation. The second phase, recently completed, made the structural and architectural adaptations needed to bring the recommendations to completion as a fully interpreted, safe, and engaging part of Waterford’s heritage. Actions included lowering the wheel pit to a level that would permit water to readily exit to the creek, reconstructing the massive timber hurst frame that supports the milling equipment, bringing the building up to code, and making nearly invisible improvements to the structural system.

Science and Engineering Research Center

The new Science and Engineering Research Center at Christopher Newport University is being added to the existing Luter Hall. The project will expand and enhance opportunities for students in high-demand STEM disciplines and will provide technology-rich instructional space for the departments of Physics, Computer Science, Engineering,  Mathematics, Kinesiology, Neuroscience, and Environmental Management. The building will accommodate state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories, classrooms, and maker spaces, as well as opportunities for cross disciplinary and faculty-student interaction and collaboration.

The architecture supports the University’s Neo-Georgian aesthetic and continues the cohesive character for the buildings surrounding the Great Lawn.

Allen Hall

Glavé & Holmes Architecture designed a new STEM academic building on Longwood University’s campus. The project established a gateway and east campus entry point. The multistory building complements the historic campus core and High Street buildings in the Palladian-Jeffersonian campus architectural style.

This structure serves as a multipurpose, adaptive building that provides approximately 43,000 square feet of academic space for student undergraduate programs. The building contains laboratories, faculty offices, various-sized classrooms, collaborative learning space, student research/inquiry space, the Center for Academic Faculty Enrichment, digital and distance learning facilities, other academic support spaces as well as a permanent home for Longwood’s Herbarium collection.

A prime function of the new building is the provision of Behavioral Studies Laboratories with accompanying vivarium, lab procedure spaces, and ancillary lab support. Two “dry lab” programs are served by the Exercise Physiology Laboratory, and a Kinesiology motion-capture studio. The project is targeted to achieve LEED Silver designation.

Liberty University School of Business

Liberty University desired a world-class, nationally recognized facility with a global reach for its new School of Business. The 78,000 sf building is located in the historic core precinct of campus and its exterior reflects and enhances the contextual, traditional character of its surrounding precinct. The building’s interior employs a contemporary aesthetic to express the School’s mission and vision for the program.

The School of Business emphasizes the connection between business and technology, showcases the integration of IT and business, and addresses the global economy. The new facility embraces technology to connect to the national business community. It advances trends for learning by including simulated work environments; spaces for collaborative, team-based learning and presentations; forward-thinking technology; spaces for interdisciplinary connectivity and entrepreneurship; a cyber security lab; and a data center.

Scott Shipp Hall Renovation and Addition

Scott Shipp Hall (c1918), is one of the core academic classroom buildings at the Virginia Military Institute. This facility, originally constructed in 1918 and expanded in 1955, serves the Institute’s academic programs in the Liberal Arts including the departments of English, International Studies, Economic/Business, Modern Languages, and History. With the Corp of Cadets growing at VMI, G&HA was commissioned to complete a rehabilitation and expansion of the facility, including renovation and rehabilitation of approximately 66,840-square-feet, and a five-story 28,000-square-foot addition. Work included a complete redesign of the 1955 wing while restoring much of the original 1918 character. The new addition is designed with a compatible Gothic Revival style to match the original structure and the overall character of VMI’s academic facilities.

The building includes five stories on a heavily sloping site and is located on a key corner of the main access road through the Post. Among the challenges in the project included developing a phasing plan to allow a portion of the building to remain operational for classes throughout the project construction. The compact site area also required careful design consideration to integrate the facility and create better accessibility for the facility, without impacting the adjacent Letcher Avenue or overwhelming surrounding facilities. The facility includes the addition of new classrooms, interactive learning spaces, faculty offices, a photo lab, and significant new space for Cadet study areas. A new Front Entry Terrace will serve as the review stand for Cadet leadership to review the daily parade of Cadets down Letcher Avenue. New technology has been integrated throughout the project to provide state-of-the-art learning spaces for the next generation of VMI Cadets.

Willow Oaks Country Club

Willow Oaks Country Club has existed on an idyllic plot of land in Richmond for the past 60 years. The architecture of the club echoed the different decades it had seen and needed a more cohesive aesthetic. Glavé & Holmes Architecture took on this task as well as other renovations to help reshape the Club’s member experience. Architectural work focused on renovating the Pro Shop envelope, providing a new covered walkway, and expanding the patio that overlooks the golf course and James River.

To help unify the Pro Shop and covered walkways, the design team mimicked existing club architecture and extended paving to provide a more formal entry. The patio expansion provides three times the dining area than previously existed and is covered with a pergola. Columns and retaining walls are faced with granite to pay homage to the club’s past as a granite quarry.

Glavé & Holmes also provided interior design services to refresh the Restaurants, Event Spaces, Public Corridors, Locker, and Restrooms in the Main Facility and Fitness Areas. The team provided a clean, transitional aesthetic while retaining a connection to the historic portion of the building. The designers provided a comprehensive interior finish package, decorative and service lighting, and a full furniture package to update the facility. Careful attention was focused on finish performance and furniture plan flexibility to accommodate a variety of Club activities for years to come.

Thomas School of Business

Glavé & Holmes Architecture designed a new School of Business for the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP). The 62,000 sf building supports teaching and research, community outreach and professional partnerships in an integrated, state-of-the-art facility. The building offers flexible spaces that promote interdisciplinary collaboration, student engagement, and community connections.

The design complements and strengthens the UNCP Master Plan and is targeted to achieve Net Zero certification. Glavé & Holmes, serving as design architect, partnered with SfL+a Architects who lead the design for sustainability and energy positive attributes of the building.