Thomas School of Business

Glavé & Holmes Architecture designed a new School of Business for the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP). The 62,000 sf building supports teaching and research, community outreach and professional partnerships in an integrated, state-of-the-art facility. The building offers flexible spaces that promote interdisciplinary collaboration, student engagement, and community connections.

The design complements and strengthens the UNCP Master Plan and is targeted to achieve Net Zero certification. Glavé & Holmes, serving as design architect, partnered with SfL+a Architects who lead the design for sustainability and energy positive attributes of the building.

Carr’s Hill Rehabilitation

Designed by architect Stanford White and constructed in 1909, Carr’s Hill is home to the President of the University of Virginia and provides meeting and entertainment space for University events. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register, this signature historic property has been renovated for the first time. Glavé & Holmes, in collaboration with Associated Architects John G Waite Associates,  prepared a feasibility study to provide programming and a site study for a new entertainment pavilion. The study included site analysis, massing studies and the development of a site plan. The team was subsequently awarded the full project to restore the exterior and interior of the historic house, as well as provide outdoor event space.

The renovation work was designed and executed to high preservation standards and in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. The landscape was also sensitively redesigned to support events in an unobtrusive way. The goal was to minimize permanent change to significant features of the buildings and site while making it more functional for modern use. Restoration design was also completed for the out-buildings located on the Carr’s Hill site.

Carr’s Hill was awarded first place for Historic Preservation at the IIDA Virginia & West Virginia Chapter/ASID IDEAS Awards, AIA Virginia’s Excellence in Design Historic Preservation Honor Award as well as the Historic Preservation Merit Award from AIA Richmond. This project is LEED Certified.

Sandy Hall Renovation

SANDY HALL, CONSTRUCTED IN 1924, is located adjacent to Virginia Tech’s Drillfield at the core of the University, and is one of the earliest buildings on campus. The 10,960-square-foot building previously served as temporary swing space for academic programs in transition, without any major renovation since its initial construction. Glavé & Holmes designed a matched pair of contextual additions for updated circulation as well as a total interior renovation of the original building. The renovated building provides critical program space for the School of Neuroscience, created in 2016, which now calls the building home. The School of Neuroscience, the first school of its kind in the United States, sought an interior environment that would stimulate casual but innovative interactions among students and faculty, facilitating spontaneous discovery of new ideas.

Robinson House Rehabilitation

THE VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS engaged Glavé & Holmes for the complete rehabilitation of the Robinson House, originally erected ca. 1820 as a family farmhouse. The structure was converted into the R.E. Lee Camp No. 1 before it became part of the VMFA in 1964. The museum’s goal was to restore the facility and adapt it for use as a regional visitor center. The Robinson House was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013 and is one of the oldest buildings in the Boulevard Historic District of Richmond. The reimagined building houses the Richmond Region Tourism Center, VMFA’s Human Resources Division, and a first-floor gallery featuring an exhibition about the story of the site from the 17th century to the present.

The project has added 3,200 additional square feet to the original 7,600- square-foot structure. The addition complements the former home’s style and introduces an accessible entrance. The expansion houses an elevator, stairway, and three floors of glass-enclosed porches that connect to the original structure. Interior work included restoring the space to reflect historical accuracies. New mechanical and electrical systems are among other building updates.

Davidson Hall Renovation

VIRGINIA TECH selected Glavé & Holmes for the renovation of three historic academic facilities on their campus, including Davidson Hall. This project rehabilitated the historic front section of Davidson Hall to provide a new administrative center for the Department as well as active learning classrooms.

The front section of Davidson Hall, covering 28,133 square feet, houses seven classrooms, in addition to multiple administrative and faculty offices for the Department of Chemistry. The building, which dates to the 1930s, received a full overhaul into a modern teaching-and-research building.

Visitors to Davidson Hall are welcomed by a new two-story atrium at the front entrance. The open atrium incorporates elements of both the traditional Collegiate Gothic and modern architecture styles seen throughout campus. Interior enhancements to the front section of the building include renovated classrooms, administrative and faculty offices, expanded A/V capabilities, modern furnishings, and a new collaborative scale-up classroom. The team fully renovated the building’s exterior and interior to remedy extensive egress and ADA deficiencies, deteriorated building systems, and flood plain vulnerability.

College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building Renovation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES was hired by Virginia Tech for the renovation of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building, originally constructed in 1899 as a YMCA building. The 14,314-square-foot building was one of the most outdated buildings on campus and received a comprehensive interior and exterior renovation. Interior upgrades include an elevator, new  energy-efficient systems, modern furnishings, and enhanced technology. A 2,000-square-foot, four-story addition was added to the northwest side.

The renovation retained several historical features. A point of pride for the building’s original architecture was the discovery, during demolition, of a large archway. Through the years and the re-purposing of the building, previous efforts had enclosed the archway. Once rediscovered, the team restored and reinstalled the archway casework.

The building is now the administrative home to the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, housing both the Office of the Dean and the Center for Humanities.

Shenkman Jewish Center

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE collaborated with the College of William and Mary to create a dedicated home for the college’s Jewish community. The team worked on the design and construction of the new Shenkman Jewish Center, a 3,000-square-foot Hillel House, as programmed and conceptualized in a planning study. This community building is situated on two lots at the corner of Jamestown Road and Cary Street. The building had the unique requirement of not only adhering to the architectural character of the campus, but also fitting in to the residential context of the surrounding homes. The building’s first floor features a large and open meeting space, an intimate study lounge, a kosher kitchen, and restrooms. The second floor provides space for a Rabbi’s office, a conference room, and a restrooms. A wooden pergola on the patio in the rear of the building is planned for future construction to accommodate a religious festival and other events.

Mary M. Torggler Fine Arts Center

The Torggler Fine Arts Center is the newest addition to Christopher Newport University’s campus serving the University’s Fine Arts Department and creating space for a new Peninsula Fine Arts Center for Newport News, Virginia. The 88,060 square-foot center is a dramatic new space that will bring nationally renowned collections to the University and the community. It houses gallery and programming space, an art history lecture hall, a large hands-on gallery, and studios.

Designed to connect to the existing Ferguson Center for the Performing Arts, the Fine Arts Center provides space for visiting exhibitions and a future University collection, and is anticipated to provide for the display of renowned collections from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and other traveling exhibitions. Highlights include 8,000 SF of new gallery space, a children’s discovery gallery, and a theater combined with a variety of support spaces including secure loading and art handling areas to meet American Alliance of Museums (AAM) accreditation standards. The building also houses new academic facilities for the University’s growing arts programs, which will support both academic learning and public education spaces. New studios and classrooms for sculpture, ceramics, drawing, painting, digital arts, and photography studios expand the arts program into new state of the art facilities. This new facility also frees up space in the existing Ferguson Center, where the project renovated nearly 17,000 SF of existing space to expand CNU’s music program facilities, with a new band room, rehearsal rooms and a recording studio.

The design of the new Fine Arts Center draws from the character of the existing Ferguson Center, originally designed by renowned architect I.M. Pei and offers a transition to the more neo-classical character of the main campus. A dramatic set of three, tiered glass domes serves as the hinge point and main public entry to this dramatic new space. The arcade from the Ferguson Center is extended to provide a consistent public face to the main public façade, while the academic spaces are located in a more neo-classical inspired rear ell. A small café in the dome area, along with two classrooms for children’s education and a Discovery gallery with glass painting box provide space for families to experience the arts. Offices, faculty studios and museum administration spaces are also provided for the building operations.

Brandon Plantation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE renovated the Breakfast Kitchen on the first floor, the Catering Kitchen and Storage Pantry in the basement, and five of the existing restrooms on the property. In the Breakfast Kitchen, the team retained this historic dumbwaiter and reconfigured the cabinetry to include a new refrigerator/freezer, cooktop, sink, microwave, and dishwasher. The designers developed two conceptual schemes for the Owner and moved forward with the one selected. Restroom updates included new window treatments, plumbing and cabinetry, light fixtures, and creating new opens or reconfiguring existing space.

North Hall Upper School Renovation

THE VERITAS SCHOOL hired Glavé & Holmes Architecture for the renovation of North Hall (formerly DuBose Hall). This two-story structure, located at the head of the school’s central lawn, was built in 1952 as the administrative building for the Presbyterian School of Christian Education. Veritas desired to reinforce the building’s key position as the home of the Upper School, while creating dynamic learning environments and offices for Upper School students, teachers, and administrators. The building serves as a welcoming “front porch” to the campus and is the principal venue for ceremonies such as graduation. Distinctive interior improvements include a new two-story lobby lined with classical details executed in finely crafted plaster, featurimg Ionic pilasters incorporating the school’s lion mascot, a modillion cornice, and an elegant coved ceiling.  Elaborate, classically designed door frames emphasize the importance of each classroom as the seat of learning.  Additional components of this project included updates to all mechanical and safety systems, new restrooms, and ADA accessibility.