Virginia General Assembly Building

Glavé & Holmes Architecture, Associate Architect, and Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Lead Architect, served as the design team for Virginia’s new General Assembly Building, a new 415,000 sf facility located on Richmond’s historic Capitol Square. As the first purpose-built facility for the General Assembly since Thomas Jefferson’s Capitol, the building houses individual offices for the 140 legislators, offices for legislative staff, public meeting rooms, a cafeteria, and other administrative spaces to support the General Assembly. Replacing an existing collection of buildings assembled over time, the new facility retains the southern and eastern facades of the historic Life Insurance Company of Virginia headquarters, repurposing the handsome classical composition and using its form to regulate the design of the new and contextually sensitive components, resulting in a proper home for the General Assembly on Capitol Square.

Glavé & Holmes (G&H) was responsible for the architectural interiors and interior design of floors four through fourteen, which accommodate the offices for the legislators, staff, and leadership of the General Assembly. A critical part of this project involved coordination of move management to ensure that proper swing space was available for the General Assembly during construction of the new building. While planning was underway for the new building, G&H designed the renovation of the nearby Pocahontas Building to serve as the temporary swing space. The G&H team then managed the logistics of displacing and relocating building tenants twice during the project – first into the Pocahontas Building and then to the new building, once complete. G&H coordinated fixtures, furnishings, and equipment installation for the Pocahontas building, as well as for the new General Assembly Building.

Poolhouse

THE POOLHOUSE REFLECTS the refined Georgian Revival of the main house by William Lawrence Bottomley. The poolhouse takes the form of a three bay loggia flanked by pedimented pavilions. It is distinguish by brick corbels, inset stucco panels, rubbed brick arches and a low parapet.

The poolouse design includes rich blue color, timeless brass lighting and hardware, and bluestone flooring that runs out to the pool. The three french doors with arched transoms and matching casement windows on the opposite side emulate a loggia. This space creates a refined upstairs opening out to the pool with a more informal downstairs, perfect for kids. The space boasts a full kitchen with built in table, seating area, bathroom with shower, changing room, and laundry which extends out to a custom mudroom with ample storage that elevates this whole residence.

Kingsmill Residence

Glavé & Holmes was brought on to demolish the owner’s current house and build a new home on the current home site with water views on three sides. Consistent with their goals, the focus of the project was to craft a gracious flow between the primary rooms of the house while maximizing views out to the water. The design centers around an arrival court with the main house centered and anchoring this paved elegant arrival. Wings on each side contain the more private aspects of the house, each of which were designed to embrace and showcase the family’s collection of art and furnishings collected over many years of travel. The rear of the house flows out to covered porches and a large bluestone, elevated patio which engages with the landscape beyond. Throughout the house, on both levels, rooms have windows and balconies to introduce light and take advantage of the site’s unique water views. This project was done in collaboration with Smith McClane Architects.

Pannill-Smith Hall

Glavé & Holmes designed a new academic building for Virginia Episcopal School (VES), a private boarding/day school located in Lynchburg, Virginia. Pannill-Smith Hall provides an innovative, yet grounded, learning environment that encourages open collaboration and provides educators the flexibility to design curricula that demonstrate the core philosophies of VES.

The design exhibits a timeless, sustainable, and forward-looking design to revitalize the core philosophies of the school and feature inspiring spaces that promote intellectual playfulness between and amongst the faculty and students. The building is adaptable to changing needs and program and provides flexibility to serve a variety of approaches to learning and teaching.

2325 Monument Avenue Rehabilitation

2325 MONUMENT AVENUE was designed by noted Richmond architect Duncan Lee in 1914 for J. P. Taylor. The 12,244 sf stucco-clad Mediterranean villa has a three-story central block with two-story wings and is capped with a tile roof. G&H provided professional historic rehabilitation and design services concerning the overall preservation of the house, as well as alterations to the first and second floors of the west service wing. A comprehensive Condition Assessment was conducted at the start of the project.

Waterford Mill Rehabilitation

THIS HISTORIC MERCHANT MILL in the National Historic Landmark village of Waterford was built in about 1830. It has been used since the 1940s as the site of a popular annual craft fair and as a symbol of the village’s history and integrity. Constant inundation of the foundation by water from Catoctin Creek, has taken a toll on the building over many years. The first phase of the project consisted of a full historic structure report, analyzing the building’s form and condition in the light of its historic significance, and outlining a series of recommendations for returning it to the best condition for long-term preservation. The second phase, recently completed, made the structural and architectural adaptations needed to bring the recommendations to completion as a fully interpreted, safe, and engaging part of Waterford’s heritage. Actions included lowering the wheel pit to a level that would permit water to readily exit to the creek, reconstructing the massive timber hurst frame that supports the milling equipment, bringing the building up to code, and making nearly invisible improvements to the structural system.

Science and Engineering Research Center

The new Science and Engineering Research Center at Christopher Newport University is being added to the existing Luter Hall. The project will expand and enhance opportunities for students in high-demand STEM disciplines and will provide technology-rich instructional space for the departments of Physics, Computer Science, Engineering,  Mathematics, Kinesiology, Neuroscience, and Environmental Management. The building will accommodate state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories, classrooms, and maker spaces, as well as opportunities for cross disciplinary and faculty-student interaction and collaboration.

The architecture supports the University’s Neo-Georgian aesthetic and continues the cohesive character for the buildings surrounding the Great Lawn.

Reid Parlor

Glavé & Holmes collaborated with Sweet Briar College to create a lively and comfortable space for students, faculty, and alumni to gather for both social and academic purposes. The design team created a classic and serene space with high performing finishes. Indoor/outdoor area rugs protect a seamless patchwork of old-and-reproduced historic wood flooring. Approximately one-third of the seating was salvaged and reupholstered from across campus to align with the college’s environmental values. The new furnishings are residential-feeling and were selected to feel cozy and residential. The design evokes a sense of an elevated “living room” where students can meet with classmates to study, enjoy an afternoon of visiting with friends or parents, or discuss an upcoming exam with a professor.

Saint Gertrude High School

Saint Gertrude High School (SGHS) is an all-girls school division of the Benedictine Schools of Richmond. SGHS desired to relocate to the 50-acre Benedictine Abbey campus, shared with Benedictine College Preparatory. Glavé & Holmes Architecture, in collaboration with Bartzen & Ball Architects, designed a new academic building to support an enrollment of 280 students. The building sits on a bluff, seventy feet above the James River Valley. It is prominently visible by cars driving northound across the Veterans Bridge above the James River. The new building includes a Chapel, a Grand Hall for school gatherings, a Dining Hall with prep-kitchen, classrooms, labs, and administrative offices. A modernized Spanish Mission style architecture was used, incorporating architectural elements of SGHS’s existing building.