Virginia General Assembly Building

Glavé & Holmes Architecture, Associate Architect, and Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Lead Architect, served as the design team for Virginia’s new General Assembly Building, a new 415,000 sf facility located on Richmond’s historic Capitol Square. As the first purpose-built facility for the General Assembly since Thomas Jefferson’s Capitol, the building houses individual offices for the 140 legislators, offices for legislative staff, public meeting rooms, a cafeteria, and other administrative spaces to support the General Assembly. Replacing an existing collection of buildings assembled over time, the new facility retains the southern and eastern facades of the historic Life Insurance Company of Virginia headquarters, repurposing the handsome classical composition and using its form to regulate the design of the new and contextually sensitive components, resulting in a proper home for the General Assembly on Capitol Square.

Glavé & Holmes (G&H) was responsible for the architectural interiors and interior design of floors four through fourteen, which accommodate the offices for the legislators, staff, and leadership of the General Assembly. A critical part of this project involved coordination of move management to ensure that proper swing space was available for the General Assembly during construction of the new building. While planning was underway for the new building, G&H designed the renovation of the nearby Pocahontas Building to serve as the temporary swing space. The G&H team then managed the logistics of displacing and relocating building tenants twice during the project – first into the Pocahontas Building and then to the new building, once complete. G&H coordinated fixtures, furnishings, and equipment installation for the Pocahontas building, as well as for the new General Assembly Building.