College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building Renovation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES was hired by Virginia Tech for the renovation of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Building, originally constructed in 1899 as a YMCA building. The 14,314-square-foot building was one of the most outdated buildings on campus and received a comprehensive interior and exterior renovation. Interior upgrades include an elevator, new  energy-efficient systems, modern furnishings, and enhanced technology. A 2,000-square-foot, four-story addition was added to the northwest side.

The renovation retained several historical features. A point of pride for the building’s original architecture was the discovery, during demolition, of a large archway. Through the years and the re-purposing of the building, previous efforts had enclosed the archway. Once rediscovered, the team restored and reinstalled the archway casework.

The building is now the administrative home to the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, housing both the Office of the Dean and the Center for Humanities.

Shenkman Jewish Center

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE collaborated with the College of William and Mary to create a dedicated home for the college’s Jewish community. The team worked on the design and construction of the new Shenkman Jewish Center, a 3,000-square-foot Hillel House, as programmed and conceptualized in a planning study. This community building is situated on two lots at the corner of Jamestown Road and Cary Street. The building had the unique requirement of not only adhering to the architectural character of the campus, but also fitting in to the residential context of the surrounding homes. The building’s first floor features a large and open meeting space, an intimate study lounge, a kosher kitchen, and restrooms. The second floor provides space for a Rabbi’s office, a conference room, and a restrooms. A wooden pergola on the patio in the rear of the building is planned for future construction to accommodate a religious festival and other events.

Mary M. Torggler Fine Arts Center

The Torggler Fine Arts Center is the newest addition to Christopher Newport University’s campus serving the University’s Fine Arts Department and creating space for a new Peninsula Fine Arts Center for Newport News, Virginia. The 88,060 square-foot center is a dramatic new space that will bring nationally renowned collections to the University and the community. It houses gallery and programming space, an art history lecture hall, a large hands-on gallery, and studios.

Designed to connect to the existing Ferguson Center for the Performing Arts, the Fine Arts Center provides space for visiting exhibitions and a future University collection, and is anticipated to provide for the display of renowned collections from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and other traveling exhibitions. Highlights include 8,000 SF of new gallery space, a children’s discovery gallery, and a theater combined with a variety of support spaces including secure loading and art handling areas to meet American Alliance of Museums (AAM) accreditation standards. The building also houses new academic facilities for the University’s growing arts programs, which will support both academic learning and public education spaces. New studios and classrooms for sculpture, ceramics, drawing, painting, digital arts, and photography studios expand the arts program into new state of the art facilities. This new facility also frees up space in the existing Ferguson Center, where the project renovated nearly 17,000 SF of existing space to expand CNU’s music program facilities, with a new band room, rehearsal rooms and a recording studio.

The design of the new Fine Arts Center draws from the character of the existing Ferguson Center, originally designed by renowned architect I.M. Pei and offers a transition to the more neo-classical character of the main campus. A dramatic set of three, tiered glass domes serves as the hinge point and main public entry to this dramatic new space. The arcade from the Ferguson Center is extended to provide a consistent public face to the main public façade, while the academic spaces are located in a more neo-classical inspired rear ell. A small café in the dome area, along with two classrooms for children’s education and a Discovery gallery with glass painting box provide space for families to experience the arts. Offices, faculty studios and museum administration spaces are also provided for the building operations.

Trible Library Expansion

CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY (CNU) selected Glavé & Holmes for the expansion and renovations to the Trible Library. The existing library was a compilation of four different decades of construction; the original 1966 one-story library, an addition in 1978, another addition in 1993, and a major addition and renovation in 2008. This project needed to remove portions of the building, renovate major sections of the earliest building, and add a large addition. In addition, the existing library contained only 200 seats and the University wanted to increase seating to over 1,000.

Modern university libraries have evolved into much more than repositories for books. G&HA helped transition the facility into a 24/7 student-focused study center, complete with an updated coffee shop, expanded media center, extensive technologies, a lecture hall, reading/study rooms and state-of-the-art archival storage and archives library.

The most dramatic addition was a new two-story Reading Room. Locating it on the second floor allowed this central feature to be flooded with natural light from the library’s cupola and skylights concealed within roof wells. This iconic, three-bay room surrounded by balconies flows out to three outdoor reading terraces. This room, named the Rosemary Trible Reading Room, and the newly renovated spaces that surround it, has become an immediate success with students who occupy the building at all hours of the day and night, fulfilling the hopes of CNU’s library staff and administration.

Brandon Plantation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE renovated the Breakfast Kitchen on the first floor, the Catering Kitchen and Storage Pantry in the basement, and five of the existing restrooms on the property. In the Breakfast Kitchen, the team retained this historic dumbwaiter and reconfigured the cabinetry to include a new refrigerator/freezer, cooktop, sink, microwave, and dishwasher. The designers developed two conceptual schemes for the Owner and moved forward with the one selected. Restroom updates included new window treatments, plumbing and cabinetry, light fixtures, and creating new opens or reconfiguring existing space.

North Hall Upper School Renovation

THE VERITAS SCHOOL hired Glavé & Holmes Architecture for the renovation of North Hall (formerly DuBose Hall). This two-story structure, located at the head of the school’s central lawn, was built in 1952 as the administrative building for the Presbyterian School of Christian Education. Veritas desired to reinforce the building’s key position as the home of the Upper School, while creating dynamic learning environments and offices for Upper School students, teachers, and administrators. The building serves as a welcoming “front porch” to the campus and is the principal venue for ceremonies such as graduation. Distinctive interior improvements include a new two-story lobby lined with classical details executed in finely crafted plaster, featurimg Ionic pilasters incorporating the school’s lion mascot, a modillion cornice, and an elegant coved ceiling.  Elaborate, classically designed door frames emphasize the importance of each classroom as the seat of learning.  Additional components of this project included updates to all mechanical and safety systems, new restrooms, and ADA accessibility.

Sweet Briar House

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE provided interior design services and an updated historic structures report for the rehabilitation of the historic Sweet Briar House at Sweet Briar College. The House, originally built in 1790, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and serves as the residence of the College’s President. The three-story brick structure is approximately 10,400 square feet.

The scope of the interior design work included updating interior finishes within the first-floor public areas of the historic house, representing approximately 3,000 sf of area and the second floor public spaces and circulation corridors, representing approximately 3,000 sf of area. Work also included the reconfiguration of toilet rooms, kitchen and ancillary spaces in support of the public areas and structural analysis of the floor system in the second floor library. All interior work was completed according the Department of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. Treatments convey an appropriate look consistent with the resource’s period of significance. The overall goal was to create a coherent, visual appearance and interpretation for the first floor public areas consistent with the high stature of the House.

Scott House Study and Rehabilitation

THE SCOTT HOUSE  is one of Richmond’s most significant examples of American Renaissance architecture and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was completed in 1911 and acquired by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in 2001. The 18,000-square-foot mansion was built for Frederic William Scott and his wife Elizabeth Strother Scott. It was modeled after the Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island, which referenced the Petit Trianon at Versailles. Interior plasterwork is attributed to prominent sculptor and plaster contractor, Ferruccio Legnaioli.

VCU commissioned Glavé & Holmes Architecture (G&HA) to provide a feasibility study to assess existing conditions, programming, and conceptual design. Subsequently, G&HA was selected to provide a historically-sensitive rehabilitation to allow the building to serve as meeting and event space for visiting and University groups.

Goals for rehabilitation the Scott House included restoration of the exterior masonry and windows; upgraded mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems; and new restrooms, office space and meeting rooms. While the rehabilitation will serve a variety of modern programmatic functions, the building’s historic fabric was restored in accordance with the Secretaty of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and the University’s preservation philosophy for historic buildings.

Radcliff Hall Admissions

Poised on the northern edge of campus, the new Admissions Office & Visitor’s Center at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia is designed to sensitively respond to two different contextual fabrics: Longwood’s campus and the Town of Farmville. This building site was strategically chosen because it is directly across High Street from Ruffner Hall, the honorific “old main” of the campus. As the only University-commissioned building on the north side of High Street, it serves as an intentional hinge between town and gown, institution and neighborhood.

Longwood University also commissioned the architectural team to design a monument to the expansion of American liberty. It celebrates the consequential history of Farmville, and honors founding father Patrick Henry, the freed-slave community of Israel Hill, and courageous Civil Rights pioneer Barbara Johns, along with the generation of students who sacrificed years of public education in their legal fight to defeat school segregation.

The building extends the University’s Jeffersonian Classical tradition, offering a recognizable front door to the campus experience and making a strong visual connection with the character of the historic campus. The building’s scale, massing, and details also respond to the adjacent historic residential fabric. The building’s wings, pitched slate roof and chimneys evoke a residential quality and a welcoming first impression, while the main “house” draws upon Palladian-Jeffersonian inspired civic proportions which relate to the scale of the historic campus.

On the interior a dramatic double-height space greets visitors while flanking sitting areas, each with fireplace, provides a more intimate setting. Expressive detailing and visual displays introduce potential new students to Longwood’s history and mission. Two presentation rooms provide a place for Longwood to address prospective students and their families. Overall, the building communicates the school’s vision to ‘develop citizen leaders prepared to make positive contributions to the common good.’

Darden Interior Renovation

GLAVÉ & HOLMES ARCHITECTURE worked with the Darden School of Business to refresh important spaces in Saunders Hall. The upgrades include new furniture, finishes, and window treatments in many of the areas with the overall effect of creating more inviting and comfortable spaces for students, faculty, and staff to collaborate.

As the formal entry to Saunders Hall, the renovation of the Rosenblum Lounge focused on transforming the space into a welcoming area. A custom reception desk provides a central point of contact for guests. The lounge leads into the Pepsico Forum, an octagonal, domed room with a new brightly colored, custom rug with a hand tufted pattern developed to reinforce Darden’s international focus. The South Lounge is a large, double height space which functions as the living room of the Business School. With a grand window elevation overlooking the lawn, G&HA enhanced the views and quality of light in the space with low profile architectural shades, and added comfortable seating arrangements as a solution to the room’s previously overly formal impression.

G&HA helped capitalize on the existing Whisnand Terrace with new tables to overlook the landscape and custom planter boxes with hidden casters allowing for reconfiguration.